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ARE YOU HOPING TO BUY A SBT PUPPY?

 

Ask yourself if a Staffordshire Bull Terrier is the right breed for you and your family.  Do you understand the true nature of the breed?  Staffords are not the right breed for everyone, they can be strong willed.  You need to know, warts and all, what you are letting yourself in for.  Speak to experienced owners before you decide.

   


Breed Club secretaries will know of forth coming shows where you can meet Staffords and their owners.  They may know planned litters from reputable breeders.  They have first-hand experience with the breed so are a good source to answer questions about the breed’s health, temperament or anything  Stafford related.  Breed Clubs are found around nationwide so there should be one fairly local.  They should be the ‘first port of call’ for anyone looking for a Stafford puppy.   

 

Buying a pedigree Stafford should not be done ‘on the cheap’ nor should it come from a bad breeder no matter how sorry you feel for the pups. By buying there you’re condemning more pups to the same fate.  If the breeders can’t sell they’ll think twice before breeding again.  By going to a responsible Staffordshire Bull Terrier breeder you stand the best chance of getting a dog that will enjoy a happy and healthy life.  

 

Beware of ads selling pups in local papers and on various dog selling sites on the internet, there are no background checks so any dodgy dealer can advertise there.   Alarm bells should ring if the ad reads like this:  

don’t go for one that’s a bargain and/or dropped price because it is the last one left or the breeder has a holiday booked in a few days – that’s not the attitude of someone who cares about their puppies and where they go.  Could they have also cut corners with rearing the litter?  

remember if something doesn’t seem right don’t be fooled to rush in and buy! Always give yourself time to think about making the right decision – a reputable breeder will not push you into having one of their pups.  They will want to find out if you and their puppy will be well suited.

 

When you have found a litter consider these questions to ask the breeder before going to see them  


Tell the breeder about yourself, if you’ve had a dog before, if you want a family pet or have showing or agility aspirations. It will give the breeder an idea of what you’re looking for in your pup i.e. a lively character would be more suited to an agility home where the quieter litter mate would be ideal for a young family.  



Expect questions to be asked, it’s only natural that the right homes are being sought by the breeder, just like you want the right pup.

 

 

When you first meet the litter, you may be met by a rabble of over enthusiastic little characters with sharp teeth, fighting for attention and dangling off your clothes.  Or they may have just been fed and are now a pile of sleepyheads that refuse to wake up. What you need to look out for:  

 

When you pick your puppy up, he/she should leave the breeder with:  


A reputable breeder will be happy to offer you any help and advice and will usually tell you they are there 24/7 if needed.

 

Staffordshire Bull Terrier Health Information

 

L-2-HGA (L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria) in Staffordshire Bull Terriers affects the central nervous system, with clinical signs usually apparent between 6-12 months (although they can appear later). Symptoms include epileptic seizures, unsteady gait, tremors, muscle stiffness as a result of exercise or excitement and altered behaviour  


 

HC  (Hereditary Cataract) in Staffordshire Bull Terriers has been recognised as an inherited condition since the late 1970’s. Affected dogs develop cataracts in both eyes at an early age



PHPV (Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous) It is a congenital condition (present at birth). This means that if a puppy is born with PHPV it can be detected by ophthalmic screening from 6 weeks of age  

 

 

PPSC  (Posterior Polar Subcapsular Cataract)  This type of cataract usually remains as a small, punctuate cataract and doesn’t usually lead to sight problems. It has been placed on schedule 3 of the BVA/KC/ISDS Eye Scheme because a number of Staffords that have been through the Scheme have been found to have this type of cataract. It cannot be detected through litter screening. The mode of inheritance is unknown and has a variable age of onset.   


Eye Screening Clinics   https://www.bva.co.uk/canine-health-schemes/eye-scheme/find-an-eye-panellist/

   

  

Litters should ALWAYS be clinically eye screened prior to leaving home and it is imperative for new puppy buyers to be aware and make sure ALL DNA and clinical health tests are in place for ALL of the above conditions.

 

 

   

You can go to the Kennel Club’s website and check any KC registered dog’s health status although litter eye screening is not recorded there.  

 https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/mateselect/test/Default.aspx

    

 

SBT Breed Standard    

https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/breed/standard.aspx?id=3080

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A WELL BRED SBT PUP PLEASE CONTACT YOUR LOCAL BREED CLUB SECRETARY WHO MAY WELL KNOW OF LITTERS PLANNED IN YOUR AREA